David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

This is an updated post from another a year ago. Here a highly intellectually focused researcher who surprises herself and begins a process of transformation from valuing strength in stoicism to embracing vulnerability as the core of strength. The first video was recorded in 2010. The second was released early this month. From Ted.com: Shame is an unspoken epidemic, the secret behind many forms of broken behavior. Brené Brown, whose earlier talk on vulnerability became a viral hit, explores what can happen when people confront their shame head-on.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

8 minute read

How we integrate or make sense of our experiences have a lot to do with how they affect us. That’s just common sense. However, the drive within psychology towards a research and evidence based practice standards has led to a move away from seeking the consensus of practicing professionals in the field on the formation of theory. A theory informed practice has been the standard for many years. Experts construct a theory based on their professional knowledge, including research.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Image via Wikipedia It’s been standard practice in Cognitive-Behavioral therapy to teach clients that our thoughts trigger our emotions. Thus with training and practice a client can learn to change feelings by changing thoughts. While that may be generally true, what CBT specialists sometimes miss is that some feelings actually control our thinking, often in ways that are beyond our awareness. When we are young, before the age of about 8, much of what we learn, we learn in emotional memory.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

I meet the most incredible people in my work. Struggle as they might with various vices like substance abuse, serial monogamy, stormy relationships or keeping a job, the people I’ve worked with consistently have a surplus of one thing I highly value: empathy. Image via Wikipedia It seems as if people who have suffered greatly often have the ability to understand other’s pain at a deeper level than most people. Often they have a depth of insight that far exceeds their “normal” peers.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

I’m going to try to write more short posts rather than work on a big paper for months before I post. There is a lot of hype about Facebook causing depression citing research. Actually, if you look, you will find the research had nothing to do with Facebook. Image via CrunchBase It all started with [this article][1] writing on [I’m going to try to write more short posts rather than work on a big paper for months before I post.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

Feel like everyone is in your way? Disappointed that everyone seems inconsiderate? Be the change in your life.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

16 minute read

This is the eighth in a series of articles about emotional intelligence for personal growth. Emotions give our experiences a sort of color, a dimension of experience very different from other senses, different from even thoughts. Yet many of us find our emotions at times more of an enemy than a friend. Our emotions serve a purpose, one that is not entirely obvious. Most current theories of emotion share the assumption that emotions serve an adaptive function in human life.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

4 minute read

Tragically another music icon ends an incredibly creative life at age 27. Besides the uncanny fact that so many (10) incredibly talented musicians who died at 27, there is the other apparent truth that they all had everything their peers could have wanted. They were incredibly successful, had huge fan base, and were selling albums and tickets to concerts galore. What could possibly have gone wrong? Ms. Winehouse said living dangerously generated her creativity, and she was often photographed half-dressed, wild-eyed and disheveled.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

Arguments over who’s right may be the most common topic of disagreement anywhere and by anybody. Check out the insights Kathryn Schulz, in her book, Being Wrong, has to offer.   Related articles Up Front: Kathryn Schulz (nytimes.com) Embrace Your Fallibility – Kathryn Schulz: On being wrong (projectmanagementessentials.wordpress.com) The Fear of Making Mistakes and Interesting Insights on Being Wrong (psychcentral.com) Gazing in the Looking Glass without Self-punishment – Emotional Intelligence for Personal Growth Part VII (davemsw.

David Earl Johnson, LICSW

3 minute read

Cover of Attachment in Psychotherapy Ask a lie detector professional and you will get a positive answer. But its not as simple as knowing how to work the instrument. The instruments used by a lie detector professional basically measure anxiety and are very similar to the machines used in biofeedback. The fact is that there is little research to support the idea that a polygraph or any other instrument can reliably detect a lie.