David Earl Johnson, LICSW

1 minute read

ResearchBlogging.orgI’m going to try to write more short posts rather than work on a big paper for months before I post.

There is a lot of hype about Facebook causing depression citing research. Actually, if you look, you will find the research had nothing to do with Facebook.

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It all started with [this article][1] writing on [ResearchBlogging.orgI’m going to try to write more short posts rather than work on a big paper for months before I post. It all started with [this article][1] writing on][2] [research article][2] where the author rather loosely used the term “Facebook depression”. There is of course **no such thing as Facebook depression**. The author submits [her disclaimer here][3]. All the more reason to read about research in the media with considerable skepticism. Here is a [past article][4] I wrote on the topic. There is reason to be concerned about spending long hours doing anything, including Facebook and the Internet, that could contribute to the development of depression. The causes are much more complex. Reference 

O’Keeffe, G., Clarke-Pearson, K., & , . (2011). The Impact of Social Media on Children, Adolescents, and Families PEDIATRICS, 127 (4), 800-804 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-0054

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