David Earl Johnson, LICSW

2 minute read

Tripped over a blog I hadn’t seen before. While the author is apparently anonymous, he makes a good point here. Clients can best ensure they are receiving quality care by being informed of ALL of the options. Seldom have I seen doctors give a second thought to the cost of the medicine their prescribe and the hardship the client may face. A study supports my viewpoint. It’s not that they are without compassion, it’s that they simply were not trained that way. They will make their best judgment of the medication for you. I do believe in general, doctors could do a better job of informing you of the consequences of his choice, including cost and side effects and alternative treatments. So be informed, ask if you doctor doesn’t volunteer the information. Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry

I’ll join many others, including the study authors, who have stated that this doesn’t mean everyone should switch from atypical antipsychotics to older antipsychotic meds. Treatment should of course be flexible and vary by patient response. But this along with a slew of other findings (like this, this, this, and this) indicate rather clearly that the medication algorithm should not necessarily start with prescribing an atypical antipsychotic medication. If we know one set of drugs is generally as safe (or in this case, as unsafe), as effective, and much less expensive than another class of drugs, the implications should be pretty clear, right? […]I’ll join many others, including the study authors, who have stated that this doesn’t mean everyone should switch from atypical antipsychotics to older antipsychotic meds. Treatment should of course be flexible and vary by patient response. But this along with a slew of other findings (like this, this, this, and this) indicate rather clearly that the medication algorithm should not necessarily start with prescribing an atypical antipsychotic medication. If we know one set of drugs is generally as safe (or in this case, as unsafe), as effective, and much less expensive than another class of drugs, the implications should be pretty clear, right?

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